wabson

part three of the ever-exciting adventure

Archive for Music

Back into the groove

The irony that when you have lots of blog-worthy things to write about you never seem to find time to do just that has been commented on many times before in conversations with friends. More worrying though is when you don’t even seem to be able to find the time to read other peoples’ musings anymore. And I guess I’ve kinda got out of the habit of doing both of those lately.

So yesterday I invested some of my remaining time off in setting up a whole bunch of subscriptions on my Google account. Their Reader has a few too many bevels and waaay too much baby blue for my liking, but at least I can access it from any of the three computer accounts I regularly use and should I get that fed up of it I figure I can always export the feed list list to something else – so long as it can read an OPML file.

I haven’t even added half the feeds I want to yet (since the process is a little cubersome in Firefox), but I’ve already managed to get back into quite a few blogs that I haven’t read regularly in a little while.

It’s nice to catch up. So today I’ve discovered (via John Dale) that Warwick’s new VC seems much more down-to-earth that the last guy, and that Amazon’s MP3 download service is apparently open for business – with pricing particularly attractive to those of us lucky enough to be living in a country that’s not headed straight for a recession ;-).

Who knows – at this rate I might even have Planet Afterlife working again soon. But don’t hold your breath.

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Mud, mud glorious mud

Glastonbury flew by. I have to go to work tomorrow but my mind is still stuck there in that rain-soaked field. I can’t describe what happened there in words – it was just magic.

Specific Things That Were Good included:

  • The rain – I’ve not seen that much water drop out of the sky in a very long time. It really started teeming down as The Who played last night, but I don’t think anybody really cared
  • The wonderful Dame Shirley Bassey – proving that she very much still has what it takes.
  • Making a flag! And making sure that Ricky from the Kaisers noticed it when he came down to meet-and-greet the crowd. That’s mine in the middle of the shot!
  • The food – we’re not talking gourmet by any stretch, but all things considered I’ve not eaten badly at all over the last five days.
  • Cider, beer, vodka and coke and G&Ts. Not that pear cider though – I’m staying away from that one in future.
  • The people. And their unrelenting determination to keep on going despite everything.

I am officially no longer a music festival virgin. Go me.

Now all I need is a tent

Well done Mr. Eavis – this year’s line-up looks amazing. Now can I have my tickets please?

Jobs on DRM

Could this be the beginning of the end for DRM? Steve Jobs surprises everyone by revealing that he wants rid of it. Or as ZDNet put it:

“You’ve got to hand it to Steve Jobs; he knows how to attract attention and how to deflect attention,” said James McQuivey, an analyst with Forrester Research. “He turned the whole European DRM question on its ear. ‘You want me to open up FairPlay? Well, I don’t even want FairPlay’.”

I think he needs educating on why MP3 and AAC are not open formats (even if you do put the word “open” in quotes) and his calling on all European citizens to protest to their local big evil record company does come across as a rather thinly veiled attempt to deflect the criticism that certain countries have directed towards Apple on the issue. But overall really encouraging.

The RIAA’s response to Jobs’ post was… Interesting. So interesting in fact that you have to wonder if they even read it through.

The Recording Industry Association of America, however, issued a statement interpreting Jobs’ letter as an offer to license the FairPlay technology. “Apple’s offer to license FairPlay to other technology companies is a welcome breakthrough and would be a real victory for fans, artists and labels. There have been many services seeking a licence to the Apple DRM. This would enable the interoperability that we have been urging for a very long time,” it said in an emailed statement.

Apple clearly have a lot still to do to actually convince the record companies that this is the right way forward, but clearly it’s a step in the right direction.

Jobs on DRM

Could this be the beginning of the end for DRM? Steve Jobs surprises everyone by revealing that he wants rid of it. Or as ZDNet put it:

“You’ve got to hand it to Steve Jobs; he knows how to attract attention and how to deflect attention,” said James McQuivey, an analyst with Forrester Research. “He turned the whole European DRM question on its ear. ‘You want me to open up FairPlay? Well, I don’t even want FairPlay’.”

I think he needs educating on why MP3 and AAC are not open formats (even if you do put the word “open” in quotes) and his calling on all European citizens to protest to their local big evil record company does come across as a rather thinly veiled attempt to deflect the criticism that certain countries have directed towards Apple on the issue. But overall really encouraging.

The RIAA’s response to Jobs’ post was… Interesting. So interesting in fact that you have to wonder if they even read it through.

The Recording Industry Association of America, however, issued a statement interpreting Jobs’ letter as an offer to license the FairPlay technology. “Apple’s offer to license FairPlay to other technology companies is a welcome breakthrough and would be a real victory for fans, artists and labels. There have been many services seeking a licence to the Apple DRM. This would enable the interoperability that we have been urging for a very long time,” it said in an emailed statement.

Apple clearly have a lot still to do to actually convince the record companies that this is the right way forward, but clearly it’s a step in the right direction.

Summary

I’m loving the Guillemots album right now – it’s full of highs and lows and unexpected bits, rather like this weekend in fact. It also helps mask the sound of drilling and hammering coming from the shop downstairs. Really, how long does it take to refit a bathroom showroom?

And in case anyone wondered, this is what I’ve been up to the last couple of weeks – thanks, Mary!

Notes on Turin Brakes

Playing

I’m rather late blogging about this and I have no excuse.

That aside, this was one of the warmest and most intimate gigs I’ve even been to. The mood was suitably fitting for a chilled Sunday evening and it finished by half ten! As for the music, it swung wildly back and forth between experimental tracks and well-established favourites but all were performed with the same gusto and genuineness that characterised the entire performance. These guys clearly love making music and Warwick to my surprise provided them with a great venue to do it at.